A study of the difference in study habits and study attitudes between college students participating in an experiential...

Publication data:

  • Author(s):
    • Mullen, Steven K
  • Date:
    1995
  • Country:
    United States of America
  • Document Type:
    Thesis
  • Keywords:
    quantitative, study habits, Prior learning assessment, PLA, portfolio assessment, portfolio, Experiential Learning, student, college, attitudes, inferential

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Abstract:

Problem: To determine the difference in study habits and study attitudes between two groups of college students. Group one consists of students participating in an experiential learning program using the portfolio assessment method of evaluation. Group two consists of students not participating in such program.

Procedure: One-hundred and ninety students enrolled in two Southern Baptist institutions of higher education in Texas offering experiential learning programs using the portfolio assessment of evaluation were surveyed for this study. Of those test, ninety-two students were participating in an experiential learning program and ninety-eight students were not participating in such program. The surveys were conducted in conjunction with Dallas Baptist University, Dallas, Texas and Wayland Baptist University, Plainview, Texas during the fall semester 1994.

Findings and Conclusion: An analysis of the data revealed that a significant difference in study habits and study attitudes exists between students participating in an experiential learning program using the portfolio assessment method of evaluation and those not participating in such program. Students participating in experiential learning scored significantly higher than students not participating in experiential learning across seven dependent variables: delay avoidance, work methods, study habits, teacher approval, education acceptance, study attitudes, and study orientation. The data was analyzed by one-tail t-test for independent groups. The data further revealed that a significant difference in study habits and study attitudes exist between students across three age groups. Group one consists of students age eighteen to twenty-four, group two consists of students age twenty-five to thirty-four, and group three consists of students age thirty-five and above. Mean scores for students age thirty-five and above were higher than mean scores for students age eighteen to twenty-four and students age twenty-five to thirty-four on each of seven dependent variables: delay avoidance, work methods, study habits, teacher approval, education acceptance, study attitudes, and study orientation. The data was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance.